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April 2019 Newsletter

April 2019 Newsletter

Depression speeds up brain aging, according to psychologists

Psychologists at the University of Sussex have found a link between depression and an acceleration of the rate at which the brain ages. Although scientists have previously reported that people with depression or anxiety have an increased risk of dementia in later life, this is the first study that provides comprehensive evidence for the effect of depression on decline in overall cognitive function, in a general population.

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Walking not enough to stay fit, strength exercises needed too

Those long morning walks are definitely good for you, but they are not enough. According to a new evidence review commissioned by Public Health England, many people are neglecting exercise for their muscles and bones. It is generally recommended that healthy adults perform two types of exercise. Aerobic activity (such as walking or mowing the lawn) should be performed 150 minutes a week if moderate, or 75 minutes a week if vigorous. And secondly, strength training exercises which should be performed two times a week.

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Researchers crack the brain’s facial-recognition code

The brain has evolved to recognize and remember many different faces. We can instantly identify a friend’s countenance among dozens in a crowded restaurant or on a busy street. And a brief glance tells us whether that person is excited or angry, happy or sad. Brain-imaging studies have revealed that several blueberry-size regions in the temporal lobe—the area under the temple—specialize in responding to faces. Neuroscientists call these areas “face patches.” But neither brain scans nor clinical studies of patients with implanted electrodes explained exactly how the cells in these patches work.

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